The finalists in this year’s Cambridge Independent Science and Technology Awards have been revealed. Cambridge Precision are delighted to sponsor the award for Innovation and wish those shortlisted for this award, and for all the other awards the very best of luck. The shortlist represents a showcase of the enormous talent in the Cambridge region across sectors from biotech to cleantech, artificial intelligence to agritech.

The Shortlist for the CPL Innovation Award

  • Crescendo Biologics. Its Humabody therapeutics are small, multispecific molecules that can be configured to engage therapeutic targets in ways that conventional antibodies cannot achieve. January brought the extension of its oncology collaboration with Takeda, which took a second licence for an oncology target in July.
  • Evonetix. The Chesterford Research Park company is developing a desktop DNA synthesis platform that will generate high fidelity DNA at scale for the rapid prototyping of biological designs. It offers the potential to synthesise and assemble whole metabolic pathways on a chip.
  • Global Graphics Software. The Cambourne Business Park company’s ScreenPro software controls ink placement from inkjet heads to improve print quality. Uniquely, it can be used in any inkjet press workflow irrespective of other software choices.
  • Microbiotica. An innovator in the evolving field of microbiome-based therapeutics and biomarkers, it is progressing therapeutic programs for live bacterial products in inflammatory bowel disease, immuno-oncology and C.difficile.
  • Nuformix. Using cocrysal technology to unlock the therapeutic potential of approved small molecule drugs, Nuformix is targeting high value unmet needs, including treatment for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.
  • Shift Bioscience. The pre-clinical drug discovery company is focused on small molecules that target damaged mitochondria, which have been shown to decelerate biological ageing in mice. It is also developing a platform for the discovery of new ageing biology and drug targets.